Rory Cowan health: Actors health condition which changed his life - Mrs Brown's Boys

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Monday, April 13, 2020

Rory Cowan health: Actors health condition which changed his life

Rory Cowan health: Actor's health discovery after a holiday in Isreael (Image: Getty Images)



RORY COWAN is the Irish actor famed for his hilarious performance in Mrs Brown's Boys. The actor had a scary health issue after his trip to Israel which changed his life. What is it?


Rory Cowan, 60, was diagnosed with a condition which is known to change a person’s life. The condition affects around four million people in the UK with symptoms including increased thirst, fatigue, always feeling hungry and increased urination. Rory explained: “I realised in Israel I had a health issue. I noticed that there was something wrong with my eyes and when I came home, I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. I got onto the I’m A Celeb people and told them I have type 2 diabetes and I haven’t heard anything back. Rory continued on the Irish Daily Star: “I have to eat regularly. You have to live on 600 calories per day and with diabetes you’ve to be on 2,000 or 3,000.”


What is diabetes?


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said: “Diabetes is the condition in which the body does not properly process food for use as energy.

"Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose, for our bodies to use for energy. ]

"The pancreas, an organ that lies near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies.”

Diabetes UK said: “Diabetes is a serious condition where your blood glucose level is too high. What all types of diabetes have in common is that they cause people to have too much glucose in their blood.

"But we all need some glucose. It’s what gives us our energy.

"We get glucose when our bodies break down the carbohydrates that we eat or drink.

“And that glucose is released into our blood. We also need a hormone called insulin.

"It’s made by our pancreas and its insulin that allows the glucose in our blood to enter our cells and fuel our bodies.

"If you don’t have diabetes, your pancreas senses when glucose has entered your bloodstream and releases the right amount of insulin, so the glucose can get into your cells.

"But if you have diabetes, this system doesn’t work.


Eating with diabetes


The Mayo Clinic explained: “A diabetes diet simply means eating the healthiest foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes.

“A diabetes diet is a healthy-eating plan that's naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories.

"Key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains.

"In fact, a diabetes diet is the best eating plan for most everyone.

A diabetes diet is based on eating three meals a day at regular times.

"This helps you better use the insulin that your body produces or gets through a medication.

A registered dietitian can help you put together a diet based on your health goals, tastes and lifestyle.

"He or she can also talk with you about how to improve your eating habits, such as choosing portion sizes that suit the needs for your size and activity level.

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